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The North Austin Tae Kwon Do Club utilizes the Chang Hon (some times called Chang Hun or Chang 'On) set of Tae Kwon Do forms while retaining some of the Japanese influenced forms and other key forms that we have adopted to better enhance the skills of our students.

The table below contains video clips of the forms that we practice.  For historical and philosophical background information please visit our TKD Forms page.

North Austin Tae Kwon Do Forms:

North Austin Tae Kwon Do Forms

Kibon Hyung

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Kibon Hyung (10 movements):  Kibon Hyung means "Beginner's Form".  It has ten movements that introduce the student to horse stance, low block and punching.  Students repeat the count which helps them learn their Korean counting.

Jase Hyung

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Jase Hyung (15 movements):  Jase Hyung means "Stance Form".  It has 15 movements that introduce the student to ready stance, front stance, horse stance and back stance.  Students repeat the count which helps them learn their Korean counting.

Kicho Hyung

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Kicho Hyung (20 movements):  Kicho Hyung means Basic Form and consists of low blocks and middle punches in an "I" or "H" pattern.  Sometimes referred to as Kicho Hyung Il Bu (1st Kicho) as there are 3 Kicho forms which us an "H" patter and different techniques.

i

Chon-Ji

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Chon-Ji (19 movements):  Literally Chon-Ji means heaven and earth. It is in the orient interpreted as the creation of the world or the beginning of human history, therefore it is the initial pattern played by the beginner. This pattern consists of two similar parts; one to represent the Heaven and the other the Earth.

Dan-Gun

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Dan-Gun (21 movements):  Dan-Gun is named after the Holy Dan Gun, the legendary founder of Korea in the year 2333 B.C..

Do-San

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Do-San (24 movements):  Do-San is a pseudonym of the patriot Ahn Chang-Ho (1876 - 1938). The 24 movements represent his entire life, which he devoted to furthering education in Korea and the Korean independence movement.

Won-Hyo

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Won-Hyo (28 movements):  Won-Hyo was the noted monk who introduced Buddhism to the Silla Dynasty in the year 686 AD.

Yul-Gok

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Yul-Gok (38 movements):  Yul-Gok is a pseudonym of a great philosopher and scholar Yi I (1536 - 1584) nicknamed the "Confucius of Korea". The 38 movements of this pattern refer to his birthplace on 38-degree latitude and the diagram of the pattern represents scholar.

Joon-Gun

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Joon-Gun (32 movements):  Joong-Gun is named after the patriot Ahn Joong-Gun who assassinated Hiro Bumi Ito, the first Japanese governor-general of Korea, known as the man who played the leading part in the Korea-Japan merger. There are 32 movements in this patter to represent Mr Ahn's age when he was executed at Lui-Shung in 1910.

Toi-Gye

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Toi-Gye (37 movements):  Toi-Gye is the pen name of the noted scholar Yi Hwang (16th century) an authority on neo-Confucianism. The 37 movements of the pattern refer to his birthplace on 37-degree latitude, the diagram represent "scholar".

Bong Pyugi Hyung

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Bong Pyugi Hyung:  Bong Pyugi Hyung means staff stretching form.  It is performed at one graceful movement from start to finish.  The student relaxes and controls their breathing in order to achieve maximum stretch.

Hwa-Rang

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Hwa-Rang (29 movements):  Hwa Rang is named after the Haw Rang youth group which originated in the Silla Dynasty in the early 7th century. The 29 movements refer to the 29th infantry Division, where Tae Kwon Do developed into maturity.

Chul-Gi

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Chul-Gi (25 movements):  Chul-Gi literally means Iron Horse and stresses techniques performed in a horse stance.  Chul-Gi is Japanese in origin and practiced by many martial arts styles.  Chul-Gi is known as Naihanchi in Okinawan Karate and as Tekki in Shotokan Karate.

Choong-Moo

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Choong-Moo (30 movements):  Choong-Moo was the name given to the great Admiral Yi Soon-Sin of the Yi Dynasty. He was reputed to have invented the first armored battleship (Kobukson) in 1592, which is said to be the precursor of the present day submarine. This pattern ends with a left hand attack, to symbolize his regrettable death. He was noted for his unrestrained loyalty to the King.

Bassai

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Bassai (29 movements):  Bassai is also Japanese in origin and is practiced in Tae Kwon Do and Tang Soo Do as well as many Japanese and Okinawan Karate styles.  Bassai is also known as Balsek.  Bassai is often translated as “to break down the fortress”.  The Korean Pronunciation of the characters that make up Bassai is “Patsai”.

Jang Bong Il Hyung

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Jang Bong Il HyungJang Bong Il Hung is  Long Staff Form #1.  It consists of strong momentum based techniques that allow beginners to take advantage of the full use of the length of the staff.

Kwang-Gae

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Kwang-Gae (39 movements):  Kwang-Gae is named after the famous Kwang-Gae-Toh-Wang, the 19th king of the Koguryo Dynasty, who regained all the lost territories including the greater part of Manchuria. The diagram represents the expansion and recovery of lost territory. The 39 movements refer to the first two figures of 391 AD, the year he came to the throne.

Po-Eun

Video Clip

Po-Eun (36 movements):  Po-Eun is the pseudonym of a loyal subject Chong-Mong-Chu (1400) who was a famous poet and whose poem "I would not serve a second master though I might be crucified a hundred times" is known to every Korean. He was also a pioneer in the field of physics. The diagram represents his unerring loyalty to the king and country towards the end of the Koryo Dynasty.

Gae-Baek

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Gae-Baek (44 Movements):  Gae-Baek is named after Gae-Baek, a great general in the Baek-Je Dynasty (660AD). The diagram represents his severe and strict military discipline.

Jang Bong Ee Hyung

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Jang Bong Ee HyungJang Bong Ee Hung is  Long Staff Form #2.  It consists of strong flow techniques that utilizing the full force of the staff, taking advantage of both it's length and verastility.

Kuk Sool Hapkido Kicho Hyung

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Kuk Sool Hapkido Kicho Hyung:  Is a fast and flowing form that is done without power in the movements.  It teaches one how to flow and move the hips smoothly in a way that are essential to Hapkido Technique